Sandwich Bread

May 18, 2011 § 4 Comments

This bread has been ignored for too long on this blog. Especially when one considers that I make it mostly every day. I mean, c’mon. It’s more a part of my kitchen than any other recipe (except maybe popcorn).  We’ve eaten sandwiches on it for years now, starting with the day I wanted us to eat healthy bread, but didn’t want to spend 3 bucks a loaf.

All signs pointed to the fact that I wasn’t going to be able to wait and watch for stages of rising or doubling in volume at that point in my life (I think I’d just had my fourth baby), so I wanted a bread machine. I looked around my church family for about 3 minutes for one that wasn’t in use (they are everywhere! You know someone at this moment that isn’t using theirs and wants to get rid of it, trust me.) and then I searched for a good, basic recipe.

It didn’t take me long to find this recipe on Amanda Blake Soule’s (incredibly creative) blog. She is amazing, so, of course, her WHO bread is too.  WHO bread is wheat, honey, and oat bread.  It worked for my budget (no special add-ins like wheat germ or flax meal), tasted delicious, and my family loved it.

The recipe has morphed a bit over the years of use in my kitchen (all whole wheat flour, no cinnamon), but we still use it constantly: toast, (beloved) fried egg sandwiches, PBJ, even fresh bread crumbs. It’s one of my security blanket recipes: with it, the pantry has possibilities.  Without it: I’m saying stuff like “we have no food in this house” quickly followed by an impulsive trip to the grocery store (never a good idea when you’re money conscious).

You  might get hooked by the ease of spending five minutes at night on it and having fresh-baked bread for sandwiches in the morning (that’s mostly how I do it).  You might like the fact that it’s filling, wholesome, and still tastes really good. Or, you might like the price. Liking all three? Ask around about that bread machine and give it a go.

Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread

inspired by Amanda Soule’s WHO Bread

1 1/4 cups water

2 tablespoons honey

2 tablespoons butter, at room temperature

1/2 teaspoon salt

3 cups whole wheat flour (white whole wheat works well, too)

1/2 cup old-fashioned oats (quick is fine in a pinch and steel-cut oats add a nutty texture, but they’re pricey)

1 tablespoon light brown sugar

2 1/4 teaspoon ( or 1 packet) yeast

Add ingredients to bread machine’s “bucket” in the order listed. Use the manufacturer’s instructions to bake bread. Carry on with the rest of your life.

** My machine has several settings, but I always use the “basic, medium brown” setting. The instruction book will guide you in the right direction.

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§ 4 Responses to Sandwich Bread

  • joy-marie says:

    Yes–I actually remember when you brought the bread machine home because I was babysitting for y’all! And you’ve been making it ever since. Alright, now I’m inspired to find an old bread machine…

    • Monica says:

      It’s good to have confirmation on the timeline in my head. That seems so long ago. Those were the days when every doll in our house was named after you!

  • Michelle says:

    Hmmmm-wonder how hard it is to make gluten free bread in a bread machine? Ever tried that?

    • Monica says:

      I’ve been researching gluten-free breads in a machine. From what I read, it seems like it’s almost easier to make it without the bread maker bc the standard bread maker cycles don’t match with the rising times of gluten-free bread. There is a special bread maker for gluten-free, but not sure you want to buy that!

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